Saturday, April 30, 2011


I posted earlier the music I would ideally listen to during a work out if I was into that sort of thing. Post-work out I actually do like to listen to quite a bit of music, read, and watch anime. Anime and music much more than reading, though, because it requires less concentration on my part. Mainly I read manga and other Japanese literature, especially when I am around people with whom I do not wish to interact socially - like on a plane.  A large portion of Operation Human Monster is devoted to eating, resting, and growing. Here, I will go over resting, especially music activities. Most of this music, and I could care less whether other people like it or not, puts me in an even more restful mood.

Oddly, most of it is not in English, my native tongue, which allows me to simply enjoy the music, not analyze it. After working out I feel like I've been run over by a truck, so I do not want to waste energy on anything. If there is one philosophy to post-work out (for me), it is to do as little as possible afterwards for at least a day!  

Anywho, here are some relaxing songs I enjoy. Aesthetic know-it-alls need not apply.

Monday, April 25, 2011


These are some rough notes on the workout I'm shooting for to-morrow morning. I've incorporated grip work, neck work, and bottom position work. In addition to this, since time is money, I'll be doing flat dumbbell bench presses, since I won't have a spotter. And this is not a leisurely Saturday afternoon where I can fool around with the power rack, benches, and j-sticks forever. Okay, so here goes.

Leg presses 1x15
Bottom position squats 1x10
Regular squats 1x10
Pullovers 1x20
Standing behind the neck presses 3x12
Shrugs 3x12
Behind the back shrugs 3x12
Flat bench dumbbell presses 3x12
One-armed deadlifts 1x15
Stiff-legged deadlifts 1x15
Bent over rows 1x15
Barbell curls 3x8
Reverse barbell curls 3x8
Nose breakers 3x8 
Neck lifts 1x15 (all four directions)

Sunday, April 24, 2011


I do not listen to work out music. I also do not carry my i-pod to the gym. Other than wrestling shoes, a polo shirt, some sweatpants or shorts, my car keys, and my mobile (which I ALWAYS leave in my truck), I do not bring much to the gym other than focus and concentration.  The downside is that the gym plays music I do not have much say over, but luckily it is so low that you would have to try to hear it to be annoyed by it. If I did have a set of workout songs, these would be the top ten - purely because of the intensity (for me, not necessarily you).

Saturday, April 23, 2011


One thing I will never do is offer people advice regarding exercise. As I frequently say, I am not a medical doctor nor am I a professional. I am merely cataloguing what has or has not worked for me. Operation Human Monster is all about me, and hopefully, as a by-product people are entertained and are provided with interesting subject matter. 

You may be different, because people are not the same.  People are not equal. So I would never presume what worked for me would work for you or vice versa. Also, I'm not interested in any one's ego trips. I could care less how great this or that workout program is compared to mine, in YOUR opinion. And another thing, do not try to halt my progress with negativity. I tune negative people out like they are a cancer, because that's what they are. Go mess up someone else's day, please. I do not have any cookies to give you for your sage advice. LOL.      

That being said, the world of exercise is full of self-proclaimed experts.  Always consult a real expert, not a charlatan!   


As far as gaining weight is concerned, shakes have done me the most good. That and Golden Corral. Below I have listed shake recipes taken from Strossen's SUPER SQUATS and McCallum's THE COMPLETE KEYS TO PROGRESS. FYI, the type's font size is set so low in McCallum's book that you will practically go blind reading it!

McCallum's Get Big Drink

In a bowl with and egg beater, or in a blender, add the following and mix:

  • 1 day's supply protein supplement
  • 2 quarts milk
  • 2 cups skim milk powder
  • 2 eggs (I would use pasteurized egg whites)
  • 4 tablespoon's peanut butter
  • 1/2 brick of your favorite ice cream
  • 1 banana
  • 4 tablespoon's malted milk powder
  • 6 tablespoon's corn syrup
Pour the admixture in containers, refrigerate, and consume the entire batch with meals throughout the day. Should be about 10 glasses' worth.

Strossen's Shake:

  • 4 cups whole milk
  • 2 cups powdered milk
  • 1/4 cup nutritional brewer's yeast
  • 1 banana
  • 2 tablespoon's lecithin
  • 1 tablespoon wheat germ oil
  • 1 large scoop ice cream 


Here are a couple of toys they do not have at my gym. What is it they say, "Wish in one hand. Shit in the other. See which one fills up first." Won't be holding my breath for any of this stuff, but, as always, donations are accepted here at Operation Human Monster.

I could buy a motorcycle for this much cheese!
Why go to the Bahamas? Blow the money on this. LOL.


Remember how I told you that a work buddy had recommended Arnold's Big Arms workout? I found an article with Arnold's program here. 

Also, just for retro kicks, check out these old videos:

All of you women out there, please wear outfits like the woman in the video is wearing sans the leggings. Thank you for your help with this matter. ;)


My training partner was telling me that he had read an article arguing that pullovers do not expand your ribcage as the old timers claimed. I think there is some confusion regarding semantics. Ribcage vs. thoracic muscles, i.e. 

I am not a medical doctor, so I will not make claims that I am not qualified to make. (I will ask my doctor the next time I see her, if she thinks pullovers strengthen the thoracic area.) However, as I told my training partner, I think a lot of these folks are over thinking pullovers. After doing twenty rep BREATHING squats of my ten rep max, I feel like a compressed accordion. When I follow the squats with pullovers, it makes me feel "back to normal," uncompressed. And I can feel a really good stretch in a my thoracic muscles and connective tissues. For what it's worth, I wouldn't stop my pullovers after squats, because I can FEEL it working my rib cage. I'm a simple guy.  

Below I have posted an instructional video on pullovers and two articles (for and against):




I do not have enough room in my apartment for a home gym, so I train at a commerical gym. The gym in the apartment complex does not have a power rack or Olympic weight set, so I've not worked out in there. A lot of the guys at work have home gyms, and I have to admit that if I had one there would not be much to it. Once I get a house, this is the home gym I would like to have:

  • Olympic weight set, with an Iron Mind Appolyn's Axle bar
  • Power rack
  • Adjustable bench
  • 2 sandbags
  • Set of dumbbells
  • Neck strap
  • Chalk
For what I'm doing, I would be set with the aforementioned equipment. If anyone has any thoughts on home gyms, feel free to comment.

Friday, April 22, 2011


It is easy to go "stale" if you do not keep things interesting. Just as in personal interactions, emotional highs and lows are key, not the same dull scenario ad nauseam.  Squats were getting "stale" for me, so I enlivened things by changing my squat routine. Normally I would just do 20 reps of my ten rep max and add 5-10 pounds to the bar every session. Nothing new there. 

I read in DINOSAUR TRAINING that a doctor was watching a football team doing squats, and he asked the coach how many players would be able to do heavy squats from the bottom position. Turns out that bottom position rack work will blow up your squat, not to mention your bench.

Today I started with 10 bottom position squats, then did 10 regular squats.  I used 60% of my ten rep max for the bottom position squats, and added 10 pounds for the regular squats and did 10 reps. The bottom position squats are brutal, even with a light weight. There is no "bouncing" you can do. You just have to drive upwards and fight gravity.

I plan on making deadlifts more interesting by incorporating one-armed deadlifts, too. 10 regular stiff-legged deadlifts, then 10 one-armed deadlifts with a barbell. Also, bench presses with bottom position work make setting up the power rack, the bench and the j-sticks seem worthwhile. So I'll start doing 10 bottom position bench presses, then as many normal bench presses as I can until failure.

It helps to keep things fresh.   

Thursday, April 21, 2011


I have read from various sources that folks with shoulder problems were re-habing with Indian clubs, because it is a light resistance (about 2 pounds) but offers full range of motion for the exercises.  I posted some videos and links to old books if anyone is interested:

Here's an old school book,THE INDIAN CLUB EXERCISE, but unfortunately there are no useful pictures. (That's the problem with a lot of old books, the technical writing back then sucked.)

Obviously these folks are trying to sell their product, but there is some info on how to acquire Indian clubs here. 


There's nothing new under the sun, but things get laconic over time. We were talking about arm work today at work. Apparently, Arnold had a concise pamphlet on arm work, called BIG ARMS, that was nothing more than the routine and pictures of how to do the exercises. Bob Hoffman, go figure, had a book called BIG ARMS, as well, but it is more in-depth. I like condensed information, because time is my most valuable possession. Does anyone have a copy of Arnold's pamphlet?

I found a Bob Hoffman book,SIMPLIFIED SYSTEM OF DUMBBELL TRAINING, and duh, these will definitely work the arms. Also, Brooks Kubik's CHALK & SWEAT has lots of all dumbbell routines.

Wednesday, April 20, 2011


At work today we were talking about Stafon Johnson's bench press accident, and one of my work buddies, Alonzo, mentioned that Johnson would have likely died if his neck had not been so strong. Seems like, except for athletes, the neck is neglected in most exercise programs. The more I read, though, folks like Bob Hoffman had neck work in a lot of programs. 

I found this article by John Wood on neck strengthening, and I learned a lot. My neck is one of my weak areas, so I was looking for some safe, SANE, yet effective training tips. I had heard about doing the wrestler's bridge, but it was helpful to learn that wall walks are a great way to build up to doing the wrestler's bridge. The Navy Seal videos I posted a while back had some neck work, but not weighted, like you would see with a machine or a head strap or the wrestler's bridge with weights included. 

Probably goes without saying to be careful and consult a doctor. I'm open to any references folks have to offer on neck work.

EDIT: I found some videos on neck work. Using dumbbells and a towel looks like a great way to build neck strength, if there is not a neck machine in your gym or home gym. Also, a weight plate and towel or head strap can be used, but it is not as easy to hold as a dumbbell. I also added a video on the wrestler's bridge. My layman's opinion is that one should work up to the neck bridge. That seems like the deep end of the pool to me. Just saying. Also, always consult a doctor and exercise safely, not stupidly. The goal is longevity.


If you have read DINOSAUR TRAINING, then you know Brooks Kubik and many others consider sandbag training the bread and butter of building those stabilization muscles. (There is a whole chapter in DINOSAUR TRAINING regarding lifting heavy awkward objects--sandbags being the least dangerous, cheapest, and most practical.) We have 80lb bags of sodium chloride at work and 100lb bags of L-aspartic acid and l-glutamic acid, and even strong guys struggle with those. So I understand what Brooks is saying about doing deadlifts, curls, or clean and presses with a hefty sandbag. Believe me, you will FEEL that the next day, even if you follow every good lifting principle in the book!  I'm a cheap bastard, so I am going to buy two duffel bags, some contractor trash bags, twine, and carry a shovel the next time I go to the Gulf Shores. LOL. In the meantime, I'll do curls with bags of salt.

Here is a quick and dirty (literally) guide to constructing a sandbag, in case you didn't know that the sand goes in the duffel bag, then you close it. ;)

Sandbag Construction Kit 


I have not had the pleasure to read or study this book's programs as of yet, but I have heard reputable folks recommend it for kettlebell programs, mainly MMA folks.  I'm not sure how it would be drastically different from an all dumbbell program, but I do see some differences. If you've read it or want to send me a free copy of the book (yes, I went there - we take donations here at Operation Human Monster), tell me your thoughts on it, etc.



Probably my favorite MMA fighter. 6 ft tall and 230lb, Fedor Emelianenko's reputation speaks for itself. A real life human monster. Just anyone who's been in the ring with him!

Tuesday, April 19, 2011


I am a major hockey freak. And I am obsessed with the Bruins. One of my favorite players for Boston is defenseman, Zdeno Chara. I like Chara because he is a real life HUMAN MONSTER. Just ask Koci:
At 6 ft 9 in and 255lb, Chara is a real life human monster. Look at this hit on Pacioretty:
Hope Chara remembered the 5 words when the douchebag Montreal Police were "investigating" the matter. So hats off to Chara for being a human monster and dominating everyone else on the ice.


Ever seen a really hot chick stroll through the weight area of the gym, and guy's spotters are leaving them hanging like Stafon Johnson? (As a side note, what a Busch league weight program USC has. Did a hot co-ed walk through, distracting his spotter, or was Stafon trying to be a big man and did benches without a spotter? Either way, what a bunch of geniuses. You'd never see that under a good S&C coach, like Scott Cochran. What goobers.) Everyone who works out will discover that most of this stuff is mind over matter to get those last couple of reps, but motivation is key.

I have a one-track mind. So, when I feel like wussing out on those last couple of reps I think of Zuzana. She has perfect form, if I may say so myself. Here she is doing two really great exercises--the burpee and the hanging leg raise:

More motivation. Serebro is about as culturally aware as I am going to get: 

Monday, April 18, 2011


A razor has a straight edge. Even a dull razor can kill you.  So where would drugs and alcohol fit into Operation Human Monster? They don't! I want to become a MONSTER, not a sot or a junkie! Plus, money diverted to shit like drugs and alcohol would cut into my food and gym money!  

First of all, illicit drugs are illegal. So messing around with illicit drugs, including the associated negative health problems, can deprive you of your non-jail personal time. Notice I do not use silly, highfalutin words like "freedom." Ever been to jail? Yeah, get back to me about how cool drugs are after spending a night in the clink. 

As for alcohol, I can think of nothing more deleterious to a workout program.  Alcohol is for getting women drunk who normally would not sleep with you, and forgetting about ugly women you would not normally sleep with the morning after you wake up next to Brunhilda. My method has always been to buy the pretty women who would not normally sleep with me copious amounts of their preferred alcoholic beverage, whilst I nurse a Perrier or Coke.  Hey, I don't argue with results.

As for chewing tobacco and cigarettes. Heinrich Heine said, he would move to Amerika, but the thought of people who chewed tobacco frightened him. Exactly. Ever seen the teeth of someone who dips? Your teeth are the first thing people notice when you smile, and a smile is a man's most powerful weapon for charming people. So, no chewing tobacco for me.  Smoking tobacco is even stupider. Do I really have to catalogue the health problems that come with this nasty habit?  Well, I will. Weightlifting requires a LOT of heavy breathing.  Consuming smoking tobacco will throw a helluva monkey wrench into that spoke! Try doing twenty squats with your ten rep max if you are a heavy smoker. They might as well chisel your tombstone over by the power rack.

Seriously, though, if you are a physical culturalist, it is a no-brainer to NOT consume beverages that lower your inhibitions, dehydrate you, and generally make you lazy. It is a no-brainer to avoid activities that could steal your non-jail personal time.  It is a no-brainer to not consume shit that is a pesticide (tobacco), and will ruin your lungs, teeth, and gums --not to mention hoards of other VITAL organs, like your HEART. 

So as a categorical imperative: no illicit drugs; no alcohol; no tobacco. Not for me, anyway.    


Wrongly, "Rome wasn't built in a day" has almost been relegated to the ash bin of duck-billed platitudes, due to the McDonald's culture and its gimme-it-it's-mine worldview.  Overall, there are a lot of hucksters out there telling people new to weightlifting to buy their company's magic Get Big Pill. Listen to the old-timers, who were doing nothing more than training hard and heavy and blowin' it out on steak and potatoes and fresh fruits and veggies and gallons upon gallons of milk.
It's as simple as this:

  1. Develop a game plan (i.e., choose a program that will exercise ALL major muscle groups in as little time as possible - about 1 hour per training session)
  2. Work out hard and heavy 2-3 times a week
  3. Rest one day in between workouts (if you can workout the day after a workout, you are doing it wrong!)
  4. Choose a diet based on your caloric needs (consult a doctor)
  5. Focus on the process! The results will be inevitable. 
As one of my friends said, "Remember: Amateurs practice until they get it right. Professionals practice until they cannot get it wrong!"


There are two variants: seated and standing. I prefer the seated behind the neck press, but you need a spotter for the seated version.  The standing version re: form -- position the bar like you would for a squat, but with a closed stance (i.e., feet together, pigeon-toed), press overhead, return bar to beginning position, do another rep. 3x12.

See Page 33, Bob Hoffman's instructions for the standing behind the neck press: Standing B.T.N. Press
See page 30, for front military presses if you do not want to do standing or seated B.T.N. presses.

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Per Brooks and other old-time lifters: With training programs, you will want to go for about six weeks, then take an off week, and start back with a new program - to keep from going stale. But which program should one choose? Ah, the dilemma.  CHALK & SWEAT has a TON of great programs in it. I highly recommend it.  Kubik is a walking encyclopedia of weightlifting knowledge, and he's collated some of the best programs in one book. Also, thanks to Mr. Kubik for signing my copy of CHALK & SWEAT. Swell guy.



Great video on form for the deadlift.


This series of videos and Strossen's SUPER SQUATS have provided me with invaluable instruction on how to squat properly.

Also, I included an example of a bottom position squat by Brooks Kubik.
Something they do not mention in the video(s), but do mention in SUPER SQUATS. Find something roughly at eye level to stare at while you are squatting (not some chick's ass who is doing bent-over rows!), doing such will help you keep a flat back and an upright neck. Also imagine that an invisible string is pulling your head up and keeping your head in line with your spine.

Sunday, April 17, 2011

O, Iron Youth, Where Art Thou?

The afternoon crowd is just starting to mill inside the commercial gym.  All-walks are present.  High school students congregate near the dumbbells and EZ-curl bars, mainly doing isolation exercises and socializing.  Occasionally, the high school crowd will wander over to the bench press, but they are afraid to lose face in front of their friends if they go heavy and do not make the lift. The yuppie crowd is content with running laps, doing cardio on treadmills, playing racket ball, and toying around with machines. Some overweight folks are on bicycle machines at the behest of their personal trainers, huffing and puffing, looking like they’ve descended into a circle of hell reserved for the slovenly.  Meanwhile, a dinosaur and a dinosaur-in-training enter the gym.  The dinosaurs head straight for the power rack.  Curiously, no line exists for the power rack.  Like a ghost town, tumbleweeds are blowing around that area of the gym.
The dinosaurs stretch before warming up with light weights on the bar.  Then the real fun begins.  They start with squats.  The seasoned dinosaur loads up the bar first. He engages it, white knuckling it, taking three huge gulps of air. He drives his elbows down, sticks his chest out, and sets his hips.  He drives the bar up, takes two steps back (legs shoulder width apart, feet set as naturally as possible), resets his air, resets his hips, spreads his knees and drops into a full squat where his thighs are parallel to the floor.  From there he drives upwards with all his might to return to the upright stance, restarting the whole process.  He completes twenty reps, and by the twentieth rep, he’s either come to Jesus or gone to meet Him.  The high school crowd looks over like they have just seen a car crash.  They are not used to seeing dinosaurs grunting and yelling, “Come on with it!” It’s sort of scary.
The dinosaur-in-training, a human toothpick wearing a polo shirt, gym pants, and wrestling shoes, like some old school Romanian power lifter from the 80’s (sans the muscles), loads up his ten rep maximum load on the bar, then goes for twenty reps.  (Before even thinking about doing twenty reps of his ten rep max, he has done twenty of fifty-percent of his ten rep max, getting his form smooth, so that he can kill the lift, not have the lift kill him.)   He gasps and sputters.  By the twentieth rep his teeth hurt from gritting and his lungs feel like they are going to explode. His face is bright red and he has bug eyes.  Onlookers gawk.  The dinosaurs look like they are leaving after those grueling squats, but wait!
They have just gone to get some water and are now back, busting out twenty reps of pullovers with a light weight (about 35 lb) to stretch out their rib cages.  Surely they are done now.  Personal trainers and gym employees are looking at them with worried faces.  They should just go.  They’ve done enough.  Think of the potential law suits!
What? Now they are headed over to do fifteen reps of stiff-legged deadlifts and are going HEAVY. They’re going to hurt themselves!  This is just uncomfortable for everyone watching.  Okay, okay. That should be it.  Who in their right mind would keep going?  Well, after three sets of twelve rep bench presses and three sets of twelve rep seated behind the neck presses and one set of fifteen rep bent-over rows, the dinosaurs are done.  They look like they are either going to grow or die.  But due to practicing form, concentration, and knowing their bodies, the dinosaurs will grow stronger. They will prevail.  And the next time they come in they are going to add five or ten pounds to the bar for all their lifts!  By the way, the workout is after a ten hour shift of grueling work at a manufacturing plant.  Oh, the humanity!
To the uninitiated, the aforementioned anecdote sounds crazy.  This sort of weightlifting is dangerous and archaic, isn’t it?  One has to be a professional athlete with a certain genetic predisposition in order for the body to handle such stress, doesn’t he?  People are obviously influenced by genetic and environmental factors and have their individual limitations, yes. The leading proponent of dinosaur training, Brooks Kubik, likens old-time strongman training to a greenhorn lumberjack—he either grows or dies.  Likewise, to get big and strong, Kubik advocates a hard and heavy training program, with the caveat of novices following beginners’ programs in his book, Chalk & Sweat, before advancing to advanced programs.  But the point remains that complex exercises are the gateway to strength and power.  
The human muscles are designed to perform complex movements, and if one keeps adding weight, the muscles, ligaments, and tendons are forced to adapt and strengthen. These are the time-tested principles of overload and progressive resistance.  The best, least time-consuming exercises are compound exercises that work entire muscle groups, not isolation exercises that target single muscles.  A novice weightlifter has to first master form and concentration before he moves on to heavy weights, yes, but he simply is not going to get big and strong standing in front of a mirror fooling with bunny weights.  To avoid blinkered selectivity: follow the advice of your physician and a seasoned weight trainer, of course, for getting bigger and stronger.  But it’d be a good bet to put down a cool million that the experts would tell you to 1) be a man, 2) go do some complex exercises, and 3) eat, rest, and grow.  Believe it or not, we’ve become so advanced that people have to be convinced of this stuff.   However, how did we reach the point where tried-and-true training methods are scoffed at and have been replaced by methods that simply do not work and do not build strength?  As manhood suffers in general, manly activities inevitably are not any too well.   
There is an attitudinal impasse American men have about hitting the gym hard and heavy. When a dinosaur is in the gym, and he sees other men doing the same exercises as women, he is reminded that, as Julius Evola said, feminism is a by-product of men setting a bad example for women.  That’s not as chauvinistic as it sounds. Explaining the historical importance of the Virgin Mary in his The Decline of the West, Oswald Spengler argued, women are history, but men make history.  Women have always been the core of society, because they are our mothers, our sisters, our wives, our best friends, and so forth. You are reading this right now, in fact, because you were born at the sacrifice of your own mother.  The ancients compared a mother giving birth with a warrior going into battle. That is a huge undertaking and responsibility—frankly, a terrible burden. Because of this very simple reality, men have always felt an obligation to reciprocate the sacrifice of all women by being strong and clever. The deal was that responsibilities were compartmentalized, and both men and women broke even, for the most part.  Men reneged on their end of the deal. When women saw the handwriting on the wall, they embraced ideologies that were a vehicle for the empowerment of women.  Women are ultimately smarter than men, and they always adapt to the situation at hand.   When men used to fail their women, the shame and dishonor was unbearable.  The Japanese ritual of seppuku was one way men typically dealt with dishonor.  (See Yukio Mishima’s film, Yukoku. Interestingly, Mishima was a fitness fanatic and wrote a manifesto, Sun and Steel, extolling the balance of the mind and body.)  Since shame and honor are in short supply nowadays, it is no wonder that Iron Youth are not pumping serious iron and hitting the gym hard and heavy in droves.  Men passed the buck to women long ago.  But the few men who still respect women and what manhood means know the score.  If you train today, train to be able to use these other “men” as human lawn darts.  Women everywhere will appreciate the public service you are performing, as they are not too happy about the world being topsy-turvy either.  That’s all that is.  


Here is an example of a bottom position bench press.


Saturday, April 16, 2011


This is a specific outline of what I am doing, but the days have changed up. 2-3 days a week is the goal of number of workouts. (The source is the book, SUPER SQUATS.) Also, drinking one shake/day per the book.

Breakfast 0700
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 slice bread
  • 1 glass milk
0930 Snack
  • 1/2 sandwich
  • 1 glass milk
1200 Lunch
  • 1 sandwich meat
  • 1 sandwich cheese
  • 1 glass milk
  • 1 piece of fruit
1500 Snack
  • 1 egg (hardboiled)
  • 1 slice cheese
  • 1 glass milk
1800 Supper
  • 3/4 lb meat
  • 2 vegetables
  • 2 glasses of milk
  • 1 piece of fruit
2100 Snack
  • 1/4 lb cheese
  • 2 glasses milk

I add 5-10 lb to the bar every time that I train. The central exercise is the squat. The squat is the surest way to get bigger and stronger. My workout focuses on complex exercises that build the chest, shoulders, upper back, arms, thighs, rib cage, lower back, calves, and abdominals, in addition to building stronger tendons and ligaments. The key is overloadand progressive poundages.  When I hit a brick wall, I stay with the new poundage until I can get through all the reps.

  • 1 x 20 Squats
  • 1 x 20 Pull-overs
  • 1 x15 stiff-legged deadlifts
  • 3 x 12 behind the neck presses
  • 3 x 12 bench presses
  • 1 x 15 bentover rows

  • 1 x 20 Squats
  • 1 x 20 Pull-overs
  • 1 x15 stiff-legged deadlifts
  • 3 x 12 behind the neck presses
  • 3 x 12 bench presses
  • 1 x 15 bentover rows
  • 1 x 20 Squats
  • 1 x 20 Pull-overs
  • 1 x15 stiff-legged deadlifts
  • 3 x 12 behind the neck presses
  • 3 x 12 bench presses
  • 1 x 15 bentover rows